2016 Lecture – Searching for the Apple Tree: What Happened in 1716?

Prof. Andrew Prescott
Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Glasgow

Prof. Andrew PrescottAndrew Prescott is Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Glasgow. He is also Theme Leader Fellow for the ‘Digital Transformations’ strategic theme of the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the major funder of advanced research in the humanities in the UK. Andrew trained as a medieval historian, completing a doctoral thesis in 1984 on the records of the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. He was a curator in the Department of Manuscripts of the British Library from 1979 to 2000, where, among other responsibilities, he was the lead curator for the pioneering digitisation project Electronic Beowulf edited by Kevin Kiernan, and took a major role in the move of the Manuscript Collections from the British Museum to St Pancras. From 2000 to 2007, Andrew served as the founding Director of the Centre for Research into Freemasonry at the University of Sheffield. He has also been Librarian of the University of Wales Lampeter and Head of the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London. Andrew is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and Royal Historical Society.

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A Higher Stand

From its origin to the present hour, in its entire vicissitudes, Masonry has been the steady unweaving friend of man. – Rev. Erastus Burr

Freemason Initiation

Every Mason who has attentively observed the action of Grand Lodges within the last few years, must have seen the indications of  progress shown by these bodies assuming a  higher position in regard to moral requirements. Although morality is one of the foundation stones of our mystic temple, yet for many years there was some remissness in enforcing its observance. Members were too often permitted to violate the moral law with impunity, forgetful of the solemn admonitions of the Order, and reckless, not only of their own standing, but of the reputation of Freemasonry itself. The moral aspect of Masonry is, to a great extent, known by the uninitiated only as it is seen in the character and conduct of its members. Hence, a swearing, drinking, gambling, Sabbath-breaking Mason, was considered by “outsiders” as a legitimate representative of the Order to which they belonged: and when told that Masonry did not sanction nor permit such things, they triumphantly pointed to facts – to A, to B, to C, – whose daily practice taught very different doctrine, and whose membership in the Craft sustained the assumption.

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S.R.I.C. – Correspondence Circle

Rosy Cross

The Society Correspondence Circle is now open to all Seekers. Contact the Society for complete details.