Searching for the Apple Tree: What Happened in 1716? – Sankey Lecture Series in Masonic Studies

One Hundred “Lost Words”

Masonic Service Association – Short Talk Bulletin – February 1947

Lost WordFreemasonry uses many common English words in a sense other than that of their usual definition -profane, heal, carpet, accepted, landmark, etc.

For the benefit of the new Mason – and perhaps for some who are older but less attentive to Masonic instruction than they might be – herewith are one hundred words commonly used in Freemasonry with a short definition of their Masonic significance.

ACACIA. An Eastern plant, sometimes a tree. Several hundred varieties are known. Masonically, an emblem of immortality.

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The Farmers Almanac for 1823 – Definition of a Freemason

The Farmers Almanac for 1823 In The Farmers Almanac for 1823 published at Andover, Mass., the following was printed under the heading, “Definition of a Freemason‘:

The real Freemason is distinguished from the rest of Mankind by the uniform unrestrained rectitude of his conduct.

Other men are honest in fear of punishment which the law might inflect. They are religious in expectation of being rewarded, or in dread of the devil, in the next world.

A Freemason would be just if there were no laws, human or divine, except those written in his heart by the finger of his Creator.

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Societas Rosicruciana in Canada – Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg Manitoba

Manitoba’s Legislative Building, principal among public buildings in the province, accommodates the legislative assembly, its committees and staff, as well as offices for the ministers and deputy ministers of all government departments. When this building was planned just after the turn of the 20th century, members were unanimous in their desire to build an imposing structure – a symbol of strength and vitality in the capital city, “not for present delight nor use alone… but such as our descendants will thank us for.”

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S.R.I.C. – Correspondence Circle

Rosy Cross

The Society Correspondence Circle is now open to all Seekers. Contact the Society for complete details.